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  Our Customers

Diamonds recovered at Lets'eng are currently not sold locally and Lets'eng Diamonds has contracted GEM Diamonds Marketing Services in Antwerp. Those interested in buying the diamonds, click here http://www.gemdiamonds.com/gem/en/sales/sales-and-marketing-at-a-glance
 

  Know Your Diamonds: The 4 C's
  1. Colour
     When rating the colour of a diamond, jewellers commonly use the letters D through Z. The rating D represents a diamond that is colourless through to the rating Z has a yellow or brownish hue. As a rule, the closer a diamond is to colourless, the more valuable and beautiful it is.

  2. Cut
    Many people make the mistake of thinking that cut means the shape of the diamond. The cut actually refers to the well-proportioned facets manufactured in the stone. A well-cut diamond - regardless of its shape - sparkles and offers the greatest brilliance. If a stone is cut poorly, it will appear less valuable because it will lack sparkle, brilliance and, therefore, beauty. Some cutters will sacrifice cut to create the largest possible diamond, thus making it too shallow or too deep of a cut and causing light to 'leak' out the sides and bottom of the diamond. Cut is graded Ideal, Premium, Very Good, Good, Fair and Poor. Generally you should seek an Ideal to Very Good diamond.

  3. Clarity 
    Clarity is an indication of a diamond's purity. Diamonds frequently have inclusions, or small flaws, air bubbles, scratches, or other minerals inside the diamond. The fewer inclusions in a diamond, the more valuable and beautiful it is.

  4. Carat
    Carat refers to the weight and therefore the size of a diamond. A carat is the equivalent of 200 milligrams and each carat has one hundred points. For example, a diamond that is a 1/2 carat can also be referred to as a 50-point diamond. But bigger isn't necessarily better. A two-carat diamond that is cut poorly is not nearly as beautiful as a smaller diamond, cut by a skilled diamond artisan. Or, it may be cut well, but have poor colour and clarity.

  Diamonds - Four of the Best

 The 603 carat Lesotho Promise

The 603 carat Lesotho Promise was recovered in August 2006.The Lesotho Promise is currently ranked as the world's 12th largest white diamond on record and the largest diamond to emerge from the Lets'eng mine to date. It is the largest rough white diamond to be recovered this century. The Lesotho Promise was sold for US$12.4 million to SAFDICO, the manufacturing arm of Graff Jewellers, at an auction in Antwerp in October 2006. The Lesotho Promise was subsequently polished into 26 D flawless diamonds, the largest of which was a 76.4 carat pear-shaped diamond. The diamonds were fashioned into a single necklace that is expected to sell in excess of US$50 million.
 

 The 493 carat Lets'eng Legacy

The Lets'eng Legacy is currently ranked as the 16th largest rough white diamond ever recovered and was named to reflect the growing legacy that the Lets'eng mine in Lesotho is creating as a producer of significant diamonds. This remarkable 493 carat diamond, discovered in September 2007, was sold at an auction in Antwerp to SAFDICO, the manufacturing arm of Graff Jewellers, for US$10.4 million in November 2007.
 

 The 478 carat Light of Lets'eng

The Leseli La Lets'eng, which means Light of Lets'eng, is a 478 carat D colour white diamond that was recovered from the Lets'eng mine in Lesotho in September 2008. The name reflects the diamond's remarkable colour and clarity, the highest possible qualities for a white diamond. The diamond is currently ranked as the 17th largest rough white diamond ever to be recovered and was the third significant recovery from Lets'eng in as many years. Initial analysis by expert diamantaires indicates that the stone could yield a D colour flawless round brilliant diamond of up to 150 carats, making it the largest diamond of its kind in history. Light of Lets'eng was sold on tender in Antwerp in November 2008 for US$18.4 million, to SAFDICO, the manufacturing arm of Graff Diamonds. The price represented an extraordinary price per carat of US$38 400, against a global average diamond price of US$90 per carat.

 

 The 550ct Lets'eng Star

The 550ct Lets'eng Star was recovered from the Lets'eng mine on 19 August 2011 and named in a gala evening held in Maseru, the capital of the Kingdom of Lesotho on Monday 19 September. The name was given to signify the growing number of "stars" in Lets'eng's growing constellation of large diamonds recovered. The Lets'eng Star is currently ranked as the 14th largest white rough diamond on record and the second largest white diamond to be recovered at Lets'eng. It is currently undergoing in-depth analysis and preliminary estimates suggest that this could be Lets'eng's most valuable diamond to date.